Monthly Gatherings:研究会のお知らせ

月例勉強会

------
2003-05年の記録
(monthly gatherings from 2003 to 2005)
                                          (◆Tokyo ●Kyoto)
           
CXVII
◆20 May 2005: "Amy Foster"
Inoue Mari

CXVI
◆20 April 2005: Romance

CXV
●2 April 2005: "Heart of Darkness"
Tanaka Kenji

CXIV
◆19 February 2005:
Ann Lane Bradshaw
"The Planter of Malata"

CXIII
◆15 January 2005:
Graham Bradshaw
"Nostromo, Panama, and the "Yanqui Conquistadores"

CXII
●18 December 2004: "Gaspar Ruiz"

CXI
●21 Nobember 2004: "Gaspar Ruiz"

CX
◆23 October 2004: An Outcast of the Islands
Shidara Yasuko

CIX
●25 September 2004: "The Lagoon"

CVIII
◆21 August 2004: "Amy Foster"
Okuda Yoko

CVII
◆12 June 2004
Ann Lane Bradshaw: Dynamite
(1) Louis Becke, "Saunderson and the Dynamite"
(2) R. L. Stevenson & Fanny Osborne, The Dynamiter
           (the chapter entitled "Zero's Tale of the Explosive Bomb")

CVI
●15 May 2004
Tanaka Kenji: Conrad and George Brown (1835-1917)

CV
◆24 April 2004: Michael North, "The Nigger of the 'Narcissus' as a Preface to Modernism," in The Dialect of Modernism (Oxford 1994) and James Clifford, "On Ethnographical Self-Fashioning: Conrad and Malinowski," in The Predicament of Culture (Harvard UP, 1988
Shidara Yasuko

CIV
●25 March 2004
Nakai Yoshikazu: Nostromo

CIII
◆21 February 2004: Michael North, "The Nigger of the 'Narcissus' as a Preface to Modernism," in The Dialect of Modernism (Oxford 1994)
Shidara Yasuko

CII
●24 January 2004
Tanaka Kenji: Conrad's voyages

CI
◆13 December 2003: Almayer's Folly
Iwashimizu Yumiko: Almayer's Folly, focusing on Mrs Almayer

C
●16 Nobember 2003
Yamamoto Kaoru:

XCIX
◆1 November 2003: Stevenson's Ebb-Tide and Conrad's Victory
Ann Lane Bradshaw

XCVIII
●23 August 2003
Tanaka: Conrad's voyages

XCVII
◆21 June2003: H. G. Wells, Tono-Bungay
Shidara Yasuko

XCVI
●7 June2003:
Yamamoto Kaoru: "Tempests in ====="

XCV
◆26 April 2003: H. G. Wells, Tono-Bungay
Shidara Yasuko

XCVIV
●15 March 2003: Nostoromo
Nakai Yoshikazu

XCIII
◆24 February 2003: "An Outpost of Progress"
Shamoto Masanobu

XCII
●25 January 2003: Nostromo, Part I
Nakai Yoshikazu




----------
■1994-2002 (From the 1st to the 91th)

I
◆23 October 1994: "The Lagoon"
Conrad's shortest story for our first meeting. The clear structural correspondence between the anticipatory opening and its contrasting ending entertained the participants.

II
◆27 November 1994: "To-morrow" and One Day More
The comparison between the short story written in 1902 and its dramatized version One Day More done three years later was effective in clarifying the strength of Conrad's narrative method in the short-story form, which is more eloquent with flashback, indirect free discourse, etc. It offered us a chance to note that the first Japanese translation of Conrad's work was of One Day More in 1914. This Penguin edition is the sole volume available containing One Day More, which was not printed in the Collected Edition.

III
◆10 December 1994: "Amy Foster"

IV
◆22 January 1995: "The Duel"
Recommended reading: J. H. Stape, "Conrad's 'The Duel': A Reconsideration," The Conradian 11, no. 1 (1986): 42-46.

V
◆12 February 1995: A Personal Record
In writing his two lives, his sea life and writing life, the stages range from Rouen 1893, Ukraine 1893, 1864, 1812, Furca Pass (Switzerland) 1873, London 1893, Borneo 1887, Tower Hill (London) 1886, Marseilles 1875, etc. The writer was conscious in making a self-mythology by linking these various stages with the refusal of chronological sequence and the striking structural unity in a rhetorical sense. The duality of the two lives thus impresses the reader even more deeply.

VI
◆23 April 1995: "Falk"

VII
◆28 May 1995: "Karain"
Conrad's typical Malay story allows a careful reader to discover the writer's various narrative techniques, such as delayed decoding, which cause suspense throughout the story. The structural complication with the frame story narrated by the European narrator vs. the central ghost tale by the Malay chieftain and effective usage of stage props like Queen Victoria's coin are a part of its strategies. Its exotic setting and a specific reference to the location of Wajo was realistic enough to provoke the curiosity of Indonesian historians.

VIII
◆18 June 1995: J. H. Stape's textual study of "A Friendly Place"

Conrad's texts, even minor ones such as this essay first published in The Daily Mail in 1912, have been subjected to numerous layers of authorial revision and editorial intervention. The Cambridge Edition of Conrad's works, based on computer collations and the study of the surviving original documents, aims to establish reliable critical texts of Conrad's canon.

IX
◆8 October 1995: "An Outpost of Progress"

X
◆19 November 1995: "The Idiots"

XI-XII
◆10 December 1995: Almayer's Folly, Chapter 1
◆28 January 1996: Almayer's Folly, Chapters 2-5
A focus on literary technique in reading the first chapter made evident the novel's impressive tech-nical variety with free indirect discourse (FID), internal monologue, flashback, and irony, which contribute to presenting an extreme mobility of nar-rative perspectives, thus making the chapter highly demanding for readers.
After studying Almayer's Folly to chapter 5 and observing Conrad's sophisticated literary techniques in his debut work, we decided to read the opening chapters of his major novels in chronological order in order to see the variety of and changes in his literary strategies between the early and late works.
Suggested reading: Jeremy Hawthorn, Joseph Conrad: Narrative Technique and Ideological Commitment (London, 1990).

XIII
◆11 February 1996: The Nigger of the "Narcissus," Chaper 1
Suggested reading: Bruce Henricksen, Nomadic Voices: Conrad and the Subject of Narrative (Univ. of Illinois, 1992).

XIV
◆3 March 1996: Lord Jim, Chapters 1-5

XV
◆21 April 1996: Nostromo, Part 1, Chapter 1
Suggested reading: Ian Watt, Joseph Conrad: Nostromo (Cambridge University Press, 1988)

XVI
◆16 May 1996: The Secret Agent, Chapter 1

XVII
◆16 June 1996: Under Western Eyes, Part 1, Opening Chapter

XVIII
◆28 July 1996: Chance, Part 1, Chapter 1

XIX
◆27 August 1996: Victory, Part 1, Chapter 1

XX
◆29 September 1996: The Shadow-Line, Chapter 1
Suggested reading: Ian Watt, "Story and Idea in Conrad's The Shadow-Line," Critical Quarterly 2, Summer (1960): 133-48.

XXI
◆27 October 1996: The Rescue, Part 1

XXII
◆17 November 1996: The Rover, Chapter 1
Continuation of our reading the opening chapters of Conrad's major novels in chronological order in order to see the variety of and changes in his literary strategies.

XXIII
◆15 December 1996: Suspense, Part 1
The end of our serial reading of the opening chapters.

XXIV
◆25 January 1997: "The Secret Sharer"

XXV
◆9 February 1997: "Poland Revisited"
Typescripts of explanatory notes prepared by J. H. Stape for the Cambridge edition of Notes on Life and Letters, to be published in 1999, were made available for our discussions by courtesy of the editor. Conrad applied technical maneuvers which he used in fiction, in manipulating time sequences, to transmit fictionalized presentation of experiences. This essay is a well-organized piece, not structurally, but impressionistically.
Suggested reading: J. H. Stape, "The Writing and Publication of Conrad's 'Poland Revisited'," Conradiana 16 (1984):155-59.

XXVI
◆3 March 1997: "Freya of the Seven Isles"

XXVII
●20 April 1997: "Typhoon"

XXVIII
●17 May 1997: "Heart of Darkness"
(Text: Heart of Darkness, ed. Ross C. Murfin, Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism, Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press, 1996).
The text is not recommended since it is a reprint of the poorly edited 1921 Heinemann edition, but it contains essays that compactly introduce five representative approaches to the novella: reader-response criticism, feminist and gender criticism, deconstruction, the new historicism, and cultural criticism.

XXIX
●22 June 1997: "The End of the Tether"
Suggested reading: J. H. Stape, "Conrad's 'Unreal City': Singapore in 'The End of the Tether'," in Conrad's Cities: Essays for Hans van Marle, ed. Gene M. Moore (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1992), 85-96.


XXX
●6 September 1997: "Il Conde" and "Prince Roman"

XXXI
◆11 October 1997: "The Tale"
Suggested reading: Jeremy Hawthorn, "'The Tale': Conrad's Unreadable Work," in Joseph Conrad: Narrative Technique and Ideological Commitment (London: Edward Arnold, 1990); Jakob Lothe, "'The Tale': Epistemological Uncertainty Dramatized through Three Concentric Tales," in Conrad's Narrative Method (Cambridge University Press, 1989).

XXXII
●15 November 1997: An Outcast of the Islands

XXXIII
◆13 December 1997: "An Anarchist" and "The Informer"

XXXIV
●25 January 1998: Victory

XXXV
◆21 February 1998: "Because of the Dollars" and "The Planter of Malata"
Cf. "Laughing Anne," in The Lagoon and Other Stories, Oxford World's Classics, 1997.

XXXVI
●15 March 1998: "The Partner" and "The Inn of the Two Witches"

XXXVII
◆25 April 1998: "The Return" and "Gaspar Ruiz"

XXXVIII
●22 May 1998: "A Smile of Fortune"
Also short presentations on "Karain" and "Heart of Darkness" by the speakers at the annual meeting of the English Literary Society of Japan.

XXXIX
◆20 June 1998: The Arrow of Gold

XL
●25 July 1998: "The Brute," "The Warrior's Soul," and "The Black Mate"
This was the 40th meeting and marked the end of the first cycle of reading all of Conrad's fiction.

XLI
◆22 August 1998: Almayer's Folly and "Geography and Some Explorers" (from Last Essays)
Cf. "Geography and Some Explorers" in National Geographic, March 1928.

XLII

●27 September 1998: "An Outpost of Progress" and Rudyard Kipling's "Slaves of the Lamp"
(Kipling's text: from Stalky & Co.)
Cf. Conrad's letters to R. B. Cunninghame Graham of 5 and 9 August 1897.

XLIII
◆24 October 1998: "The Lagoon"

XLIV
●7 November 1998: "Amy Foster"

XLV
◆5 December 1998: The Nigger of the "Narcissus" and Henry James, "The Art of Fiction"
Nakai Asako

XLVI
●30 January 1999: "The Secret Sharer"
Tanaka Kenji, introducing Daniel R. Schwarz, ed., The Secret Sharer (Boston, Bedford Books, 1997).

XLVII
◆27 February 1999: Lord Jim
Mark Vallely:

XLVIII
●21 March 1999: Under Western Eyes and "The Secret Sharer"
Oshimoto Toshimasa: What is Razumov's crime?

XLIX
◆24 April 1999: "An Outpost of Progress"
Okuda Yoko: focusing on the technique of irony

L
●23 May 1999: "Autocracy and War"
Tanaka Kenji: On the Russo-Japanese War and the North Sea Incident

LI
◆27 June 1999: "Falk"
M. Shamoto, focusing on individualism in the story

LII
●24 July 1999: Lord Jim
Kaneko Yukio: The introduction of multiple critical views on the work and the significance of "home"

LIII
◆28 August 1999: Victory
Ito Masanori: Physiognomy and Lena's unreadable face

LIV
●19 September 1999: Under Western Eyes
Miyakawa Misako: comparing the novel with Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

LV
◆30 October 1999: "The Duel"
Okuda Yoko: The theme of the double (1)

LVI
●20 November 1999: "The Secret Sharer"
Tanaka Kenji: The theme of the double (2)

LVII
◆11 December 1999: "The End of the Tether"
Shidara Yasuko: Intertextuality with the relevant primary sources

LVIII
●22 January 2000: "Karain"
Kenneth Jones: "Karain" and Linda Dryden's Joseph Conrad and the Imperial Romance

LIX
◆19 February 2000: Chance
Ann Lane Bradshaw: What is the rationale for the narrative method?

LX
●19 March 2000: The Congo Diary
Kenji Tanaka

LXI
◆22 April 2000: The Secret Agent
Yoko Okuda

LXII
◆27 May 2000: The Shadow-Line
Shidara Yasuko

LXIII
●24 June 2000: "Heart of Darkness"
Nakai Yoshikazu

LXIV
●31 July 2000: The Nigger of the 'Narcissus'
Okuda Yoko

LXV
◆26 August 2000: Max Beerbohm, "The Feast"
Nishimura Takashi

LXVI
●23 September 2000: Laughing Anne
Kaneko Yukio

LXVII
◆21 October 2000: "Well-Done!" "Tradition," and "Confidence" from Notes on Life and Letters; "The Dover Patrol" from Last Essays
Kenneth Jones

LXVIII
●25 November 2000: "To-morrow"
Tanaka Kenji

LXIX
◆26 December 2000: "John Galsworthy," "Stephen Crane," and "Christmas Day at Sea," from Last Essays
Shamoto Masanobu

LXX
●27 January 2001: "The Torrens: A Personal Tribute," "Outside Literature," "Memorandum," and "Travel," from Last Essays
Okuda Yoko


LXXI
◆24 February 2001: "An Observer in Malaya"; and Hugh Clifford, "Umat," from Studies in Brown Humanity
Shidara Yasuko

LXXII
●25 March 2001: "Up-river Book" and "Heart of Darkness"
Tanaka Kenji

LXXIII
◆28 April 2001: Conrad's English prose style
Ann Lane Bradshaw

LXXIV
●27 May 2001: "Typhoon"
Nakai Yoshikazu

LXXV
◆16 June 2001: R. L. Stevenson, "The Beach of Falesa" as one of Conrad's precursory texts
Shidara Yasuko

LXXVI
●7 July 2001: "Typhoon"
Nakai Yoshikazu

LXXVII
◆23 August 2001: "The Secret Sharer" in comparison with Captain Frederick Marryat's Peter Simple
Nishimura Takashi:

LXXVIII
●29 September 2001: "Rulers of East and West" and "In Captivity" from The Mirror of the Sea
Tanaka Kenji

LXXIX
◆20 October 2001
Okuda Yoko: Conrad's letters

LXXX
●1 December 2001:
Charlie F. Canning, "Shoju-maru"

LXXXI
◆22 December 2001:
Graham Bradshaw: Dostoevsky and Under Western Eyes

LXXXII
●26 January 2002:
Tanaka Kenji: "Geography and Some Explorers" and Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage

LXXXIII
◆23 Febuary 2002
Okuda and Shidara: papers to be read at the Vancouver conference

LXXXIV
●30 March 2002: The Shadow-Line

LXXXV
◆11 May 2002:
Ann Bradwhaw: "Conrad and Louis Becke"

LXXXVI
8 June 2002
Charlie F. Canning: "Eugine O'Neill and ==="

LXXXVII
◆13 July 2002: "The End of the Tether"
Shamoto Masanobu

LXXXVIII
●28 September 2002: "Landfalls and Departures"
Tanaka Kenji

LXXXIX
◆19 October 2002: "Youth"
Okuda Yoko

XC
●7 December 2002
=====

XCI
◆21 Decebember 2002
Shidara Yasuko: The English Review: Ford as the editor and Conrad as a contributor